Dangers of Driving Young: Could the Legal Driving Age be blamed for high death rates?

You will usually find hundreds of students preparing to study and get their driver´s license. But recent studies and polls show that teenage driving  brings in a body count more than any other drivers. In fact, the age of 16 is the highest death rate in teenagers. While some believe it´s a fine age to begin the rules of the road, you will others believing it is far too dangerous. During my attendance of driving classes, I discovered a poll that shows male teenagers are the most dangerous types of drivers on the road, due to their frequent reputation of drunk driving and speeding. I talked to Garrett Smith, who drives to his job at Bruster’s, about the hazards of driving so young. 

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33% of deaths among 13 to 19-year-olds in 2010 occurred in motor vehicle crashes.on
  •  What is the leading cause?

The law almost pressures them to and causes them to believe they’re obligated to do so.

  •  What can be prevented?

Many young drivers are so eager to go places on their own. Be patient and go at your own pace if you are not confident in your driving skills. 

  •  Do you think someone can handle such responsibility at a young age?

Not really, since they have experienced so little driving.

  •  When/where should young adults learn to drive? 

They should start studying around 17 for a permit and then should be able to get a license. 

  •  What age, had it be raised, should people drive?

I believe the driving age should be raised to 18 because 16 does not seem like the proper age for such a new experience.

With such irregular driving going on down here, it’s no wonder how many deaths there are when it comes to teenage driving. 56% of teenage drivers even admit they drive while talking on the phone. Could you be as wise as young drivers like Smith, and be safe on the road?

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More Stories:

The Student Becomes the Teacher by Nadia Williams 

Junior Year Blues by Emma Shoup 

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